Day 314 – Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer

You know Dasher and Dancer
And Prancer and Vixen,
Comet and Cupid
And Donner and Blitzen.
But do you recall
The most famous reindeer of all?
Rudolph, The Red-Nosed Reindeer

I love the story of Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. But I have often wondered, where did the story of Rudolph begin?   Here’s a little history.

The Chicago-based Montgomery Ward company, department store operators, had been purchasing and distributing children’s coloring books as Christmas gifts for their customers for several years. In 1939, Montgomery Ward tapped one of their own employees to create a book for them, thus saving money. 34-year old copywriter Robert L. May wrote the story of Rudolph the Red-nosed Reindeer in 1939, and 2.4 million copies were handed out that year. Despite the wartime paper shortage, over 6 million copies had been distributed by 1946. May drew in part on the story “The Ugly Duckling” and in part from his own experiences as an often taunted, small, frail youth to create the story of the misfit reindeer. Though Rollo and Reginald were considered, May settled on Rudolph as his reindeer’s name.

Writing in verse as a series of rhyming couplets, May tested the story as he went along on his 4-year old daughter Barbara, who loved the story

May’s story “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” was printed commercially in 1947 and in 1948 a nine-minute cartoon of the story was shown in theaters. When May’s brother-in-law, songwriter Johnny Marks, wrote the lyrics and melody for the song “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer”, the Rudolph phenomenon was born. Turned down by many musical artists afraid to contend with the legend of Santa Claus, the song was recorded by Gene Autry in 1949 at the urging of Autry’s wife. The song sold two million copies that year, going on to become one of the best-selling songs of all time, second only to Bing Crosby’s “White Christmas”. And let us not forget the contribution of Chuck Berry with his classic 1958 song, “Run, Run Rudolph”.

The 1964 television special about Rudolph, narrated by Burl Ives, remains a holiday favorite to this day and Rudolph himself has become a much-loved Christmas icon.

And what about when our favorite reindeer meets our favorite snowman. Please, don’t get me started with Frosty.

But what Rudolph really represents is the story of each of us in our struggles, our blessings, our disappointments and our victories. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer relates to us a simple but truthful parable about what life itself means and why.

I am grateful to share the love I have for Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer with you!

Here is my favorite version of the 1964 classic set to Harry Connick’s jazzy version of Rudolph the Red-Nose Reindeer.  Enjoy!

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About Dave, The Gratitude Guy

Dave Block, aka “Dave, The Gratitude Guy” is an emerging entrepreneur on a mission to spread a powerful message about the importance of having daily gratitude in your life. His cause is to create positive change in the world by educating everyone, through his appearances, blogs, videos, and future projects that the best way for us to value our present day happiness is to be grateful for what we have in our life right now. If more people lived life this way, great changes would occur. Just understand that by being who you really are, you will attract more of what you truly want in your life. And gratitude is the key that opens up the door to happiness. Recently, Dave have branded himself with Thank God I... to create a new interview series called "The Thank God I..." Interview. The interviews are with empowering people from Movies, TV, Music,and Sports who have encountered hardships and had to endure tough times in life only to emerge stronger by their attitude and how they are thankful for it all. For more information, please visit www.thankgodi.com
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